KINO Satoshi

KINO Satoshi ceramics KINO Satoshi ceramics

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Profile

2012 M.F.A., Kyoto City University of Arts
2010 B.F.A., Kyoto Seika University Faculty of Arts
1987 Born in Kyoto

Solo Exhibitions

2015 Gallery Kochukyo, Tokyo
Evening Calm, Tallery Geifu, Kyoto (’13)
2014 Zanshin,Gallery Sokyo, Kyoto
New Taipei City Yungge Ceramic Museum, Taiwan
Nihonbashi Takashimaya, Tokyo
2013 Galley Haku (’11, ’10)

Group Exhibitions

2015 Art Fair Tokyo
Propositions from Ceramics, Gallery Haku, Osaka (’14,’13, ’12)
Diverse Men, Diverse Minds, Gallery Midori, Tochigi (’13, ’14)
Forms of Clay, Gallery Kitanozaka, Hyogo (’12, ’13, ’14)
2014 Forms with Handles- part2, Gallery Voice, Gifu
2013 Bi-o-motte Yo-to-nasu, Nihonbashi Takashimaya, Tokyo
Forms of Clay, Gallery Kitanozaka, Hyogo
2012 Forms of Vessels, Gallery Voice, Gifu
Sake Cups for Summer, Gallery Café Kyoto Saryo, Kyoto
RELEASE / SEE, Zen Art Space, U.S. A.
Contemporary Asian Ceramics, New Taipei City Yungge Ceramic Museum (’11), Taiwan
2011 Kamo Kanzetsu Sai, Kamigamo Shrine, Kyoto
2010 Forms with Lids, Gallery Voice, Gifu

Awards

2016 Judge’s award, 2016 Taiwan Ceramic Biennale
2014 Grand Prize, The International Bienal of Ceramc of Marratixi
2013 Grand Prize, The 4th ICMEA Symposium 2013
Board of Education Award, Osaka Kogei Exhibition
2012 Encouragement Award, Exhibition for Art Collages in Kyoto
Judge’s Excellent Award, 7th Tsuki-no-Art Exhibition
Judge’s Special Award, Amakusa Ceramic Exhibition
2011 Encouragement Award, 26th National Cultural Festival - Kyoto
Semi-excellent Award, 6th Tsuki-no-Art Exhibition

Collections

Fule International Ceramic Art Museum, China
City of Marratxi, Spain
New Taipei City Yungge Ceramic Museum, Taiwan
Newark Museum, U.S.A.
National Museum of Slovenia, Slovenia
The International Museum of Ceramics in Faenza, Italy
The Museum of Ceramic Art, Japan

Artist Statement

The forms of my porcelain sculptures are expressed solely in lines, and I want to leave a resonance of the piece in the air as well as in the hearts of people who see my work.

It was exciting for me to discover that when I am throwing a piece, I could stretch the clay into very thin forms, and this process would erase the marks of my hands and fingers. It’s as though the chunk of clay becomes absorbed into the air, and only a thin outline remains on the wheel. To me this is a resonance of something that has vanished.

I am also fascinated by the nature of porcelain which can simultaneously express two extremes—solidness and delicacy, or stress and tranquility. It is as though these contrasting aspects react upon each other like an echo. Inspiration for my sculptural forms usually comes from nature—formless things like wind, air, water, but sometimes also the appealing forms of plants and the landscape. The beautiful balance I see in these things inspire my creations.

Japanese aesthetics are deeply related to nature, and there are many poetic words that express and evoke nature. I use these words as titles for my work because they trigger the imaginations of people who see my work. As I said earlier, my philosophy is expressed through the integration of the material and techniques that I employ.